Time for Frankie Coolin: A Neglected Literary Gem


I was disappointed that Bill Granger’s iconic novel, Time for Frankie Coolin, did not make it into the recently published Chicago by the Book: 101 Publications that Shaped the City and Its Image. Through the fictionalized trials and tribulations of Frankie, we better understand the interpersonal dynamics of the White Flight that dramatically changed Chicago’s demographics from 1960 to 1990, when Chicago lost 1,446,795 of its white residents.
Time for Frankie Coolin was first published in 1982 under the nom de plume Bill Griffith. Griffith was Granger’s mother’s maiden name. Granger was a hard-boiled Chicago journalist who wrote for three papers in 40 years. Well into his journalistic career, he started writing novels at a frenetic pace of about one a year; 25 in total. Public Murders and The November Man are probably his best known. Yet Time for Frankie Coolin remains his great Chicago novel.
In his Foreword to a new edition of the book in 2014, Bill Savage writes “Granger’s prose is simply outstanding, with dialogue that crackles and descriptive passages of the city and its landscapes that hearken back to Bellow, Algren, Farrell, Wright, and Sinclair.” I couldn’t agree more.
I invite you to join us at the Cliff Dwellers on Saturday morning June 22nd at 11:00 as we discuss Time for Frankie Coolin. The Cliff Dwellers is located at 200 S. Michigan, directly across the street from the Art Institute. The discussion is free and open to the public.

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